Monthly Archives: February 2019

Climate Geoengineering: Taking note

The featured image shown above was taken by me over the skies of western Wyoming in February of 2018. Through all my travels in recent years, however, I realized this was not an isolated sighting of what is being termed “chemtrails”. I’ve seen these over the skies of SD, MN, and WI. While I have not seen our skies in the midwest littered as much as some pictures in areas of FL and CA, it certainly raises the question as to whether they will increase, what are they, and who is doing this.

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New yarn and new techniques brought my new favorite winter hats this season. Crocheted bean stitch, knit pillars, and a soft chunky yarn from Loops & Threads.

The top left pattern is a modified version of the Malia Beanie – Pattern by Little Monkeys Crochet at littlemonkeyscrochet.com. I modified this pattern by using a chunky yarn (rather than a worsted weight) and a K hook size – thereby decreasing the number of chains required for the vertical rows (I used 22: 18 for the main section and 4 for the brim). I also eliminated the 3rd round of the magic circle and worked directly from the 2nd round. To compensate for the loss of chains on the 3rd round of the magic circle, I (randomly and inadvertently) created 2 rows from each chain rather than moving to the next for every row. Also, for the large bean stitch, I pulled through after 6 sts on the hook rather than 8 – again, to compensate for the bulkier yarn. And finally, at the end of my rows, I crocheted (using a slip-stitch) the last row to the first (rather than sewing together). That gave me an additional row of a raised chain but I could have eliminated this by ending one or two rows earlier.

Added note on size: this hat turned out to be a Large, or possibly even XL. Since I was somewhat winging-it with the modifications I was really happy how it turned out but would like to try again with a little more systematic approach. Working from the 2nd round of the magic circle gives you 24 chains to work your rows from, and if you start 2 rows from each chain you’ll end up with 48 rows.

The bottom two hats use some of the Carbon Copy pattern from Sarah Keller at knotanotherhat.com.
Here again I used Loops & Threads, Charisma – a bulky yarn, with US 8 circular needles.
I inverted the purl rows for knit and used 2×2 ribbing for the brims.
With the blue I stopped short of a slouch hat because I wanted this for a ski hat and it turned out great – it’s warm and stays on tight! With the off-white I completed the full slouch but it makes a really bulky (read: heavy) slouch hat. It’s okay but not my favorite.
Regarding size: I cast on 72 sts and used about 10 rows of 2×2 ribbing for the brim. This created a ladies M/L.
Regarding the rows/pattern: After the brim I purled for 2 rows then knit for 6.
The “pillar” rows can be done in any way – on the blue hat I purled for only 1 row before beginning the 1×1 ribbing – but for the white hat I purled 2 rows before the 1×1 ribbing.
No matter how it’s done, the pillars give the hat some flexibility – especially important with a bulky yarn using size 8 needles – otherwise you get a stiff hat that’s not very form-fitting. Also, these are really quick and easy to make so I plan to do a few more and will try to post a standard size chart for the ski hat in S/M/L after a few more.

This is my version of Light & Up from Caroline Wiens. I used Schoppel-Wolle, Das Paar (Warmfront Color 2208). I’m calling it my passion scarf because I absolutely loved how it turned out. With over 200 sts on the needles at the end of the project, it takes some serious time and commitment to finish this scarf (kudos to all those who have, seeing the pictures on the link above there are some very pretty results with this pattern).

Also, I loved how the colors turned out with the Das Paar. I ran out of the it at the end and finished with a heavier weight, black yarn similar to Lion’s Brand Landscapes (100% acrylic) (you can see this in the pictures). Unfortunately, I finished this project over a year ago and can’t find the label for this yarn! It turned out nicely, however, because the smoothness and added weight eliminated the need for the tassels and gave it a nice border.

Every documentary and/or book I’ve linked on the sidebar should be watched or read by every American. These movies are an eye-opener into how some of our everyday conveniences are produced, marketed, and worst, accepted. I’ve now seen each of these twice, with exception to Super Size Me – which wrapped up my past week “food supply” documentary-binge.

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Regenerative Organic Agriculture

I had to post this as a phrase, or term, I want embedded in my mind. For almost a decade words, phrases, and acronyms like “organic”, “all-natural”, “GMO”, “BPA”, “rBGH”, “certified”, “soy lecithin”, “cow’s milk protein”, “high-fructose corn syrup”, along with additives, preservatives, and other words I can’t pronounce have tumbled around in my mind over many a shopping experience. While easier to avoid at local farmer’s markets, not so much at many regional grocers.

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